Hello again Mainlands Golfers!

The Saturday Scramble winners are posted below.

Flight A

1st Place Matt, Johnny, Brian, Anthony, and Rick -12

2nd Place Peter,Kim, and Tim -9

3rd Place Jim, Kevin, Ed, and Charlie -9

Closest to the pin was Steve on team #1.

On a tangent I find the closest to the pin prize a bit ridiculous.  Going forward the prize for closest to the pin will be a full dozen golf balls.

The Sunday Scramble was awesome.  If you were there you know what I am talking about.  The weather was blisteringly hot with an extra helping of humidity.  We played in a modified Stableford Format.  3 points for Eagles, 2 Points for Birdies, 1 Point for par, and 0 points for Bogies or higher.

1st Place was Nicholas Cavell and Todd Stevens, with 23 points.  They each have $33 in their club credit accounts.

2nd Place – David MacMarchy, Hub Bartlett with 23 points as well.  They each have $19.80 in their club credit accounts.

3rd Place – John Harrington and Mark Nelson with 23 points.  They each have $13.20 in their club credit accounts.

Closest to the Pin was Rob Neighbor!  Yay Rob.  You have a dozen golf balls waiting for you as well.

Finally I would like to state that due to the popularity of the Sunday Scramble we will only be able to start teams that show up AND PAY before 15 minutes of 4pm.  It is just too difficult to accommodate everyone efficiently unless they are checked in and paid by quarter til four.  If a team shows up at ten minutes to four they will have to follow the scramble and just play plain old regular every day stroke golf.  (This means you Neighbor.)

Good Day to the Drawers of the golf ball and Salutations to those who Slice.  The rest of you we will meet in the middle.

The Saturday Scramble had 4 winners in two flights.

Flight A

1st Place – Frank, Rex, Daniel, Carl, Charlie -11

2nd Place – Chuck, Peter, Robert, Tim, -11

3rd Place – Greg, Al, Craig, Marc, Ron -10

Flight B

1st Place – Matt, Brian, Richard, -9

Closest to the Pin was Dan of team #5.  Dan has golf balls behind the counter and the rest of the winners have money added to their club credit accounts.

The Sunday Scramble had a great turnout with 18 Twosomes.  Unfortunately their was some lightning witnessed by more than a few golfers less than an hour into the round.  Anyone who turned in and left will get a raincheck for an upcoming Sunday Scramble.  The rain/lightning delay lasted about 15 minutes.  The remaining 15 teams did finish and so the scramble continued.  Mike and I started on the back 9 and after triple bogeying #11 we didn’t see any lightning but were seeing stars.  I believe our 69 would have put us in solo place for 8th place.  Cheers to being aggressive off the tee when you shouldn’t.

1st Place – Stewart Elder & Dennis Haysley 63  Each of you has $24 in your club credit accounts.

2nd Place – The Carl Nicks Team 63  Each of you has $14.40 in your club credit accounts

3rd Place – David Lanham & Mike Corley 63  Each of you has $9.60 in your club credit accounts

Closest to the Pin on the 3rd Hole was  . . . Karen Koslowski.  Congratulations Karen, you have golf balls behind the counter for you.

 

The summer season means we often play with the threat of weather.  If you feel nervous about playing with cloud cover, or in rain, or with thunder in the distance, or for any reason please come in and get a raincheck.  No round of golf is worth a tragedy.

Hello you hip and capable golfers!

We have just ended a very dry and ridiculously hot June.  I urge everyone to stay hydrated weather you are out golfing or just watching TV at home.  Heat exhaustion is a real danger.

Now that the public service announcement is over let’s get to the Saturday Scramble Results . . .

Flight A

1st Place is Matt, Dave, and Rick -13

2nd Place is Greg, Al, Craig, Marc, and Ron -12

3rd Place Frank, Rex, Carl, Charlie, and Gary -11

Flight B

1st Place is Jim, Stuart, Ed, AJ, and Charlie -8

Greg on team #3 won the closest to the pin this week.

The Sunday Scramble played the 4-Club Scramble Format this week.

1st Place – Steve Hensley and Cam Barrows 62          Each of you has $28.50 in your club credit accounts

2nd Place – Rob Neighbor and Vaughn Rodriguez 64    Each of you has $17.10 in your club credit accounts

3rd Place was Mike and Me 65          Each of you has $11.40 in your club credit accounts

4th Place was David Lanham and Mike Corley 65

The 4-Club is always one of my favorites.  Next week I heard we might do a WORST Ball Scramble.

A good walk spoiled?  Well that is why I RIDE when I play.  Take that Mark Twain!

 

Hello and good golfing to everyone out there.  It was a beautiful weather weekend.  And of course it was hot.

The Saturday Scramble went out in all of its glory and splendor.

Flight A

1st Place – Jim, Stuart, Kevin, Ed, & Charlie -12

2nd Place – Tom, Clem, John, & Steve -11

3rd Place – Jim, Steve, Vincent, & Bill -10

Flight B

1st Place – Matt, Johnny, John, Tony, & Mike -10

2nd Place – Grey, Al, Chris, Marc, & Al A

 

The Closest to the Pin was John Carroll on #7

Winners have club credit added to their respective accounts and John has a dozen balls behind the counter waiting for him.

The Sunday 2-Person Scramble had its first run of the summer and it was quite the turn out.  48 people turned out and we took up the entire front 9.  As such pot was $144.00.  Mike talks about how we are not playing for $1,200,000.00, but it seems like it is getting close.  First Place team gets 50%.  2nd Place gets 30%.  3rd place gets guess how much? Closest to the pin was on #16 and the winner gets a dozen balls this week.  Team Mike / Tyson does not put money in the pot so we are ineligible, we play strictly for the glory…. or the shame.  TomatO, TomAto I guess.

Before I announce the winners let’s give a shout out to two eagles made.

GO LINDA HOSKIN for eagle-ing #7 ALL BY HERSELF!!

And CHEERS to JEFF TAMLYN for eagle-ing #9.

1st Place Charlie Purkiser and Toni Cothran -7 Each of you has $36 in club credit added to your accounts.

2nd Place John Harrington and Mark Nelson -6 Each of you won $21.60.

3rd Place Matt Easterman and Dave Lent -4 Each of you won $14.40

Thank you to everyone who came out.  You all helped make a great event.  Mike and myself are looking forward to a long, hot, summer of golf.

 

May your golf ball find firm fairways, gentle greens, and may it rest gently at the bottom of the cup after just one putt.

 

Until next week,

Tyson

By Keely Levins
When you’re practicing your short game, are you just dropping a bunch of balls and hitting the same chip, with the same club, over and over? Be honest—a lot of people do it. But what it leads to on-course is you just grabbing that trusty club and trying to make it work for whatever shot you may have. Golf Digest’s Chief Digital Instructor Michael Breed says it’s not the right tactic. “Limiting yourself to one technique around the greens won’t lead you to success,” says Breed.
Instead, put your focus on evaluating the situation at hand. Ask yourself a few basic questions: How far do I want the ball to fly? How far do I want the ball to run out? How fast is the green?
If you have a ways to hit it and a lot of green to work with, Breed says to grab a mid-iron, like your 7-iron. Use a smaller swing and let the ball come out low and run. This type of shot will lead to a lot more success than grabbing that 56-degree wedge you love so much, taking a half-swing at it and trying to get it to fly and stop near the hole.
If there isn’t much between you and the green, you’re going to need to hit a shot that goes higher than the bump-and-run, and that lands softly. Breed has a few moves that make this scary shot easy: First, open the clubface — it’ll get you more loft and launch the ball with more trajectory. Next, stand farther away from the ball than you usually would. This will help you get it up in the air. And finally, as you come into impact, the handle swings through staying close to your lead thigh as the clubhead whizzes by and hits the ball.
These tips are just a small part of a larger video series hosted by Breed called Michael Breed’s Playbook which you can access here. There are three lessons in the series, covering how you should practice your driving, your short game, and putting so that when you’re on the course, you’re ready to find the fairway, knock it close and make the putt.
Source: Golf Digest
By Keely Levins
Learn how to turn back, not sway.
Let’s talk about hip turn. James Kinney, one of our Golf Digest Best Young Teachers and Director of Instruction at GolfTec Omaha, says that from the data GolfTec has collected, they’ve found lower handicap golfers have a more centered lower body at the top of the swing. Meaning, they don’t sway.
If you’re swaying off the ball, you’re moving yourself off of your starting position. The low point of your swing moves back when you sway back, so you’re going to have to shift forward to get your club to bottom out where the ball is. That takes a lot of timing, and is going to end up producing some ugly shots.
So, instead, Kinney says you should turn.
“When turning your hips, you are able to stay more centered over the golf ball in your backswing and the low point of your swing stays in the proper position, resulting in consistent contact.”
To practice turning, Kinney says to set up in a doorway. Have your back foot against the doorframe. When you make your lower body move back, your hip will hit the door fame if you’re swaying. If you’re turning, your hips are safe from hitting the frame.
Remember that feeling of turning when you’re on the course and your ball striking is going to get a whole lot more consistent.
Source: Golf Digest

The Rules of Golf are tricky! Thankfully, we’ve got the guru. Our Rules Guy knows the book front to back. Got a question? He’s got all the answers.

On a short par 3 over water, the tee box was placed with an overhanging tree on the line to the pin. I moved the left tee marker a few feet so that the tee shot could be hit without obstruction. This was done before everyone teed off — in fact, my opponent played first and I hit second. What is the correct penalty? This has sparked a huge debate in my men’s league. —JASON WRIGHT, VIA E-MAIL

If you notice that tee markers are poorly placed, are you allowed to adjust their position before play begins? Our expert has the answer.

Jason, the fact that you ask what the penalty is — rather than if there’s a penalty — suggests you know you’ve done wrong … and you have. (Admitting that you have a problem, however, is the first step toward recovery of your honor.)

Tee markers are fixed — yes, even poorly positioned ones. Under Rule 8.1a, if you move one to gain a potential advantage by improving the conditions affecting the stroke, you must take the general penalty, which is two strokes in stroke play or loss of hole in match play. (Other players could likewise be subject to penalty if they knowingly took advantage of your maneuver.)

Source: Golf.com

BY DAVE PELZ
One of the things that separates Tour players from the rest of us is that the former are intimately familiar with their games. They know how different shots will unfold regardless of where the ball is sitting, especially around the green (where difficult lies abound). Not surprisingly, that’s where weekend players tend to cough up strokes.
There are four parts to every short-game shot. Failing in any area will almost surely lead to a poor result.
They are:
1. Judging the lie.
2. Selecting a club.
3. Predicting how the ball will react when it lands.
4. Executing the swing.
This article addresses the first — and perhaps the most important — part of the shot equation. If you can’t pull off good shots from bad lies, you’ll never reach your scoring goals.
In my opinion, the only way to develop this skill is through experience. Pros have the advantage of unlimited practice time, but you can begin to catch up with a simple three-shot experiment that I use in my schools. Its entire purpose is to open your eyes to the various backspin outcomes that can be created by the type of lie you’re facing.
For this “Backspin vs. Lie” experiment, you’ll need your lob wedge, a tee and three balls. Select a 20- to 30-yard shot around a green that forces you to carry a bunker but that provides plenty of room between the apron and the pin. Drop one ball into the rough, another into a normal fairway lie, and tee up the third so it’s about a half-inch above the grass. The goal is to land all three shots in the same place on the green, about a third of the way from the edge to the flagstick. (Repeat any shot that misses the landing spot.)
Once you’re successful from all three lies, check the results, which should look something like what’s pictured in the photo at right. What you’ll notice is that the shot from the rough rolled out the farthest — the mass of grass that wedged its way between the ball and the clubface at impact killed most of the backspin. The shot from the fairway stopped short of the first, even though it landed in the same spot. That’s because you generated much more backspin due to the cleaner lie. And for the teed-up third ball, which had zero grass on the clubface to interfere with contact, you created max backspin and stopped the ball almost immediately after it hit the green.
Of course, you never get to tee up your wedge shots, but that’s not the point. What this exercise teaches is how lie effects spin, and that controlling spin is the trick to hitting short shots close. It’s an invaluable lesson. Try it from different distances using different wedges. The experience will turn you into a cagey vet in no time.
Source: Golf.com

Join us for a round of golf this weekend!

18 HOLES WITH CART- $25

SATURDAY & SUNDAY – AFTER 1:00 PM

price online already adjusted

We’re keeping it fun with some presidential golf facts!

  • Donald Trump
    Has won 19 club championships. Handicap Index reported to be 2.8
  • John F. Kennedy
    Despite chronic back pain, averaged 80.
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower
    Installed a green outside the Oval Office; member at Augusta National. Became friends with Arnold Palmer.
  • Gerald R. Ford
    Despite a clumsy image, a legitimate 80s-shooter. He also played with Arnold Palmer.
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt
    At 39, polio robbed him of a powerful golf swing
  • George W. Bush
    His handicap reported to dip under 10, post-presidency. He gave up golf during his presidency at the start of the Iraq War.
  • George H.W. Bush
    Once got his handicap down to 11. Favorite exclamation on the course was “Power outage!” when putts fell short
  • Bill Clinton
    Can break 90, especially using his “Billigans”
  • Barack Obama
    The lefty plays hoops and golf, more than 330 rounds during his two terms.
  • Ronald Reagan
    Didn’t play often or well (best was low 90s)
  • Warren G. Harding
    Struggled to break 95
  • Woodrow Wilson
    Played over 1,000 Rounds in office but almost never broke 100. He even enlisted his Secret Service agents to paint his golf balls black so that he could practice in the snow.
  • Richard M. Nixon
    He shot 79 once and quit the game
  • Lyndon B. Johnson
    Played with senators to secure votes for the Civil Rights Act of 1964
  • Calvin Coolidge
    When he vacated the White House, he left his clubs behind

 

Sources: Golf Digest, Cheat Sheet